Local GPs will soon begin the mammoth task of helping vaccinate the entire Australian population against COVID-19.

Thousands of clinics have been approved to participate, but some doctors believe the rollout is seriously flawed.

From March 22, GPs will be enlisted to give the elderly and vulnerable the AstraZeneca vaccine.
Health Minister Greg Hunt and former Prime Minister Julia Gillard.
Health Minister Greg Hunt and former Prime Minister Julia Gillard. (Nine)

“Whether it’s smallpox, measles, hooping cough, flu and now COVID-19, vaccinations can save lives and protect lives,” Health Minister Greg Hunt said.

Former Prime Minister Julia Gillard is in agreement.

“I can understand people are feeling a little bit anxious,” Ms Gillard said.

“I would recommend to them they get information from reliable sources.”

While studies have shown both vaccines are more successful in the real world than in clinical trials, there is still a grey area for pregnant women.

Former Prime Minister Julia Gillard receives her COVID-19 vaccine.
Former Prime Minister Julia Gillard receives her COVID-19 vaccine. (Nine)

“We don’t know for sure if they are safe in pregnancy,” Professor Brendan Murphy said.

“No reason why they wouldn’t be safe.”

In two weeks, 1200 accredited clinics will offer the jab. By April, 4000 GPs will be administering the vaccine and by October it’s hoped more than 20 million adults will be vaccinated — that’s 200,000 a day.

But some doctors fear there won’t be enough supply.

“With the current allocation we’ve got is 100 it will take to end of next year and it also is going to cause chaos prioritising patients,” GP Dr Craig Richards told 9News.



This content first appear on 9news

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